The OHS Pipe Organ Database

BuilderID 230

Builder Identification

Detroit, Michigan, 1889–1898; Hartford, Connecticut 1899–1948.

Additional Notes

  • From the OHS PC Database, derived from A Guide to North American Organbuilders by David H. Fox (Organ Historical Society, 1997). —

    Born 16 May 1869 in Poddington, Bedfordshire, England; son of Jonathan Austin (an English organbuilder), brother of Basil G. and Harry W. Austin; uncle of Basil F. and Frederic B. Austin; with the Farrand & Votey Organ Co. of Detroit, Michigan, 1889; with Clough & Warren of Detroit, Michigan, in summer of 1893; with Karn firm of Woodstock, Ontario, Canada; with Carlton Michell of Boston, Massachusetts, 1899; established Austin Organ Co. of Hartford, CT, with Basil Austin, 1889; general manager of firm, became president, 1907; died 17 Sep. 1948 in Hartford, Connecticut.

    Sources:

    • Diapason, July 1943, 6.
    • Diapason, Oct. 1948, 1.

  • From the OHS Database Builders Listing editor, updated March 8, 2016. —

    John T. Austin was an Englishman who emigrated to the United States in 1889 and began his American career with the Farrand & Votey Organ Co. of Detroit, Michigan. It was while working with that firm that he developed his signature Universal Air Chest system for which he received a U.S. Patent. His employers declined to purchase the patent, instead Austin was able to make an agreement with another Detroit firm, Clough & Warren Company, a reed organ maker. The firm would start a new pipe organ division to be led by John Austin. The first Austin-patent organs were built in 1893, the same year that John’s brother, Basil Austin, came to the United States. Unfortunately, in 1898 while John was installing Opus 22 at Fourth Congregational Church in Hartford Connecticut, the Clough & Warren pipe organ factory was destroyed by fire, and was not to be rebuilt.

    After the fire, John T. Austin and his brother Basil G. Austin incorporated the business as the Austin Organ Company. The Austins rented space in Boston to complete two contracts in New England, but during that year some prominent businessmen of Hartford, Connecticut convinced John T. Austin to relocate there. He leased a space on Woodland Street in the recently built, but never-occupied, Watson H. Bliss mills building in the spring of 1899. A few years later, the company was able to purchase the property. John T. Austin served as general manager of the firm, and became president in 1907.

    Between 1915 and 1931 the Austin company produced 1200 pipe organs, approximately 75 instruments per year. However, 1929 brought the stock market crash and the Great Depression, and sales began to dwindle. By 1935, the officials of the company ceased organ production and began liquidating company assets, most of which were purchased by the newly established Austin Organs, Inc., operated by John Austin’s nephews, Frederic B. and Basil F. Austin. In 1937 Austin Organs, Inc. officially became successors to Austin Organ Company. The new company relocated to a smaller facility behind the huge complex that had served as the Austin Organ Company factory for 38 years. During World War II, the factory was contracted to produce coat hangers and glider wings for the war effort, but the glider wing contract was cancelled shortly thereafter. After the war, Austin Organs, Inc. experienced tremendous growth with the booming post war economy. John T. Austin lived long enough to see the beginning of new prosperity, he died September 17, 1948 in Hartford, Connecticut.

    Sources:

    • Austin Organs. Inc. website, Accessed Nov 15, 2015.
    • Orpha Ochse. The History of the Organ in the United States (Indiana University Press, 1975) p.

  • From the OHS PC Database, derived from A Guide to North American Organbuilders, rev. ed. by David H. Fox (Organ Historical Society, 1997). —

    Patents held by John T. Austin:

    • Patent #537,664; 16 Apr. 1895; pipe organ
    • Patent #585,946; 6 Jul. 1897; pneumatic action and coupler
    • Patent #613,875; 8 Nov. 1898; marine governor
    • Patent #684,339; 8 Oct. 1901; electropneumatic action
    • Patent #732,694; 7 Jul. 1903; engraving machine
    • Patent #847,636; 19 Mar. 1907; organ action
    • Patent #890,117; 9 Jun. 1908; blower
    • Patent #1,078,078; 11 Nov. 1913; combination action
    • Patent #1,078,079; 11 Nov. 1913; combination action
    • Patent #1,090,963; 24 Mar. 1914; shutter mechanism
    • Patent #1,097,507; 19 May 1914; key mechanism
    • Patent #1,099,097; 16 Jun. 1914; tracker mechanism
    • Patent #1,100,045; 16 Jun. 1914; organ
    • Patent #1,100,046; 16 Jun. 1914; organ valve
    • Patent #1,107,127; 11 Aug. 1914; electric action
    • Patent #1,107,128; 11 Aug. 1914; organ action
    • Patent #1,107,129; 11 Aug. 1914; key and stop action
    • Patent #1,107,130; 11 Aug. 1914; organ action
    • Patent #1,113,861; 13 Oct. 1914; key mechanism
    • Patent #1,119,486; 1 Dec. 1914; organ shutter
    • Patent #1,123,216; 5 Jan. 1915; stop action
    • Patent #1,124,685; 12 Jan. 1915; pedal mechanism
    • Patent #1,131,814; 16 Mar. 1915; stop action
    • Patent #1,145,867; 6 Jul. 1915; organ
    • Patent #1,164,973; 21 Dec. 1915; shutter mechanism
    • Patent #1,173,404; 29 Feb. 1916; air chest
    • Patent #1,173,405; 29 Feb. 1916; shutter mechanism
    • Patent #1,179,389; 18 Apr. 1916; circuit control device
    • Patent #1,187,679; 20 Jun. 1916; music sheet
    • Patent #1,199,959; 3 Oct. 1916; combination action
    • Patent #1,212,165; 9 Jan. 1917; tracker mechanism
    • Patent #1,303,626; 13 May 1919; key mechanism
    • Patent #1,322,506; 25 Nov. 1919; pneumatic circuit closer
    • Patent #1,379,296; 24 May 1921; bearing
    • Patent #1,419,486; 13 Jun. 1922; resonator for reed pipe
    • Patent #1,456,612; 29 May 1923; combination action
    • Patent #1,602,369; 5 Oct. 1926; automatic regulator
    • Patent #1,639,324; 16 Aug. 1927; shutter mechanism
    • Patent #1,640,306; 23 Aug. 1927; organ action
    • Patent #1,640,307; 23 Aug. 1927; stop action
    • Patent #1,678,546; 24 Jul. 1928; stop action
    • Patent #1,765,495; 17 Jun. 1930; shutter mechanism
    • Patent #1,879,015; 27 Sep. 1932; tracker mechanism
    • Patent #1,901,622; 14 Mar. 1933; combination action
    • Patent #1,901,623; 14 Mar. 1933; combination action
    • Patent #1,905,880; 25 Apr. 1933; combination action
    • Patent #2,021,126; 19 Nov. 1935; stop action
    • Patent #2,052,690; 1 Sep. 1936; elevator
    • Patent #2,072,844; 9 Mar. 1937; swell engine

     

  • Several members of the Austin family were organ builders and involved with the Austin companies in the United States:

    For an introduction to the Austin family and their company history, see: Austin Family Overview.

     

  • For further information on the companies, see Austin Organ Co. and Austin Organs. Inc.

Database Entries

There are no entries in the database that describe organs by John Turnell Austin.


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