The OHS Pipe Organ Database

High Street Methodist Church
230 E. High St.
Springfield, Ohio 45505

OHS Database ID 59693.

See the address on Google Maps.


Status and Condition

This organ is no longer whole; parts were dispersed, and some may have been re-used in a different installation.
We received the most recent update on this organ's state and condition May 5, 2017.


Technical Details

Notes

  • This entry describes an original installation of a new pipe organ. Identified by J. A. Hefner, using information found in High Str. UMC history by Dan Walter, 2016.
    High Str. previously used a reed organ. The new Felgemaker pipe organ was installed in 1881 (cost $1950); the church was electrified ca. late 1890s but the organ may not have been.
    It was reinstalled in 1904 when the church was rebuilt, and it was officially in disrepair by 1936 church report. By summer 1941, the organ often didn't work at all, leading to discussion about replacing it with an "electric" [electro-pneumatic] one, along with chancel renovation (enter Schantz).
    The Felgemaker was removed in 1941, though "a few pipes" were reused in the 1942 Schantz organ, but the grand majority of the new organ was Schantz-built. (Database Manager. December 8, 2016)
  • Updated by J. A. Hefner, naming this as the source of information: Dan Walter, High Str. UMC history.
    Not long after installation, the organ fell out of tune and required service. Felgemaker had agreed to service it for a year, but church trustees frequently had to write him to ensure that contract was upheld. Unsurprisingly, the organ was virtually unusable at the end of its life. (Steven E. Lawson. May 4, 2017)
  • Updated by J. A. Hefner, listing conversations with this person as the source of the information: Aaron M. Tellers (Tellers Organ Co.).
    According to email correspondence with Aaron M. Tellers (Tellers Organ Co., with ABF archives), three Felgemaker organs were installed in Springfield, Ohio in 1881 - opus 429, 430, 433. Opus 430 was Christ Episcopal [relocated to Trinity Episcopal in London, 1918], and the other two were installed in St. Paul Methodist and High Street Methodist.
    Mr. Tellers presumes they were shipped and installed at the same time; no spec sheet exists but the three apparently were similar. (Database Manager. May 5, 2017)

Online Documents

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  • Pipe Organs of High Street Methodist. Summary description of pipe organs in the church's history. Author: J.A. Hefner Source: Original digital document. Document Date. Unknown. Document received from James R. Stettner 2016-12-08.

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Related Database Entries

As a matter of best practice, we maintain separate entries each time an organ is modified or relocated. Click a link to go to descriptions of other phases in this instrument's life.

Other Websites

The database contains no links to external websites that describe this organ. If you know of any sites that contain information about it, please use the Update form to send us the URL.

Photographs

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Archive Photograph provided by Dan Walter and courtesy of J. A. Hefner. Sanctuary Interior, Chancel, and Pipe Facade (1941)
Archive Photograph provided by Dan Walter and courtesy of J. A. Hefner. Sanctuary Interior, Chancel, and Pipe Facade (prior to 1942)

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Stoplist

We would very much like to have a stoplist of this organ to display on this page. If you have the information to provide one, please use one of these links to send it to us: